BlogGeneralBringing the Science of Learning into Classrooms

Bringing the Science of Learning into Classrooms

Our brains don’t really develop on a predetermined timeline, and kids of various ages arrive in classes with varying levels of cognitive, social, and emotional development. Understanding where each student is developmentally and building a learning experience that begins at their current level is what personalization is all about. According to learning research, in order to retain knowledge, the learner must actively think about it—merely being exposed to it multiple times is insufficient to establish long-term memory. Scientists and practitioners have recently realized that comprehending learning in all of its forms will necessitate diverse approaches spanning these and other fields. More important than students’ interest in the subject or willingness to learn is how they digest knowledge.

    Register to Get Free Mock Test and Study Material



    +91

    Verify OTP Code (required)

    I agree to the terms and conditions and privacy policy.

    What is the science of learning?

    Traditionally, research into learning has been conducted across a wide range of fields. Basic research into the brain mechanisms underlying learning in humans and other species has traditionally been conducted in the fields of Neuroscience and Biology; research into how the human mind “computes,” developing and using knowledge, has traditionally been conducted in the fields of Cognitive Science and Psychology; research into how machines (e.g. computers and robots) learn has traditionally been conducted in the fields of Computer Science and other areas of Engineering; and research into how learning occurs in the classroom has traditionally been conducted in the fields of Computer Science and other areas of Engineering.

    Our neural tissues alter in reaction to our environment, experiences, and relationships. For example, a young child who is subjected to repeated adversity at home may typically retreat into “fight or flight” mode to defend themselves from violence or abuse. The circuitry of the brain rewires over time, favoring aggressive or anxious behaviors at the expense of intellect, logic, and memory.

    Principles Of Learning

    Learning science ideas are based on a body of cognitive science studies on how students learn.

    1. Students learn new concepts by building on previous knowledge—concepts they already understand.
    2. To learn new knowledge, students require practice, but it’s ideal to spread it out across time and alternate between different types of content.
    3. The feedback that is explicit, unambiguous, and focused on improvement is critical to learning.
    4. Giving kids too much knowledge at once can make it difficult for them to learn.
    5. When trying to retain knowledge, students should consider what it means and why it is essential in order to strengthen their understanding.
    6. Students are more likely to learn in surroundings that make them feel comfortable and appreciated.

    Critical Aspects About Science Of Learning

    The brain is one of our most mysterious organs. And we’ve had a long-standing misunderstanding of what it is and how it works.

    We’re still a long way from knowing everything there is to know about it, but we’ve made a lot of significant advances in the last several decades. This is especially true when it comes to learning: we now have a far better understanding of how humans learn, organize, recall, and retrieve data.

    More data does not imply more learning.

    It takes time and effort to process data. This implies that understanding requires effort on the part of the brain. This is why you can’t simply give your kids additional material and expect a linear rise in learning.

    The point at which a person’s brain becomes overloaded by new knowledge is referred to as “cognitive overload” by brain scientists. Cognitive overload occurs when there is too much new knowledge, and learning suffers as a result.

    Consistent student motivation improves knowledge retention.

    Students may find it difficult to see the long-term effects of their learning. They see school as something they must do because their parents have mandated it. As a result, teachers’ tasks are made more difficult from the outset by the fact that the majority of the pupils in their class simply do not want to be there. Start your day off right with some inspiration. Motivation is essential for increasing student engagement, attention span, and, as a result, knowledge retention. This lack of desire might lead to a lack of concentration and focus, as well as trouble remembering what they’ve learned.

    It’s all about context.

    When you have no clue how you’ll use the knowledge you’re learning in the actual world, it’s difficult to stay motivated to study. I can’t tell you how many times high school math has made me question my existence: why am I learning this? What does this imply? Who am I, exactly? Remind your pupils why the information they’re learning is vital or, at the very least, related to their lives. Make up some real-life scenarios in which people could observe the information in action or at work.

    Ensure that kids are focused on their future.

    Students with good marks get noticed by higher schools, universities, and employers. Good grades can also lead to scholarships, fellowships, and other financial incentives for students. However, it can be difficult for children to remember this when they are swamped with data to memorize, equations to solve, and schoolwork that takes away valuable Minecraft time. This is especially true of subjects that people believe are unrelated to their desired job path. It is therefore your responsibility to remind your students of the importance of good marks in terms of their future potential.

    Go after the cool kids.

    While it may be tempting to bring the popular kids down a notch in the classroom, you can actually use their “street cred” to motivate the rest of the students. Social pressure is a powerful motivator for students, and if you can quietly target the cool kids and get them to participate enthusiastically in class, their peers are likely to follow suit.

    Use rewards to motivate your students.

    Humans are programmed to prefer smaller, more immediate rewards over larger, longer-term ones. While devoting time and effort to studying offers long-term benefits (high grades, college, profession, etc. ), as an educator, you can play on your students’ innate desire for rapid satisfaction by delivering “right now” rewards.

    Prime student’s brain for learning.

    Ineffective use of valuable teaching time involves introducing students to subjects for the first time in the classroom or lecture hall. They will get the chance to have a basic comprehension of the content. Their brains will be pre-programmed to learn. Rather than teaching students from scratch, you can use class time to advance and solidify their learning.

    Encourage students to participate.

    Shame has no place in this setting.

    There will be no shaming of pupils’ queries (that goes for teachers too). The only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked.

    Recognize, recognize, and compliment pupils’ efforts.

    Recognize good questions and congratulate kids on their foresight, diligence, and bravery in asking them. If you’re very impressed, make a point of calling them after class to express your gratitude. A little acknowledgment can go a long way.

    Make asking questions a real task.

    Show students a high-level outline of the upcoming chapter the day before each lesson and ask them what questions they would ask to flesh it out with greater depth.

    Make and use flashcards to increase student engagement

    Flashcards are an extraordinarily effective approach for learning new content, especially in knowledge-intensive disciplines like biology, history, medicine, science, and even language jargon. Benefits:

    • Encourage students to participate actively in breaking down course material into its atomic components.
    • Keep students up to date with the information rather than letting them fall behind and have to cram and catch up in the days leading up to a test or exam.
    • Students will be more engaged if they work together with their classmates.

    Also read: Online Classes vs. Traditional Classroom Learning

    FAQs:

    Q1. Explain any two principles behind the science of learning.

    Answer:

    1. Students learn new concepts by building on previous knowledge—concepts they already understand.
    2. To learn new knowledge, students require practice, but it’s ideal to spread it out across time and alternate between different types of content.

    Q2. Name any 2 strategies to bring the science of learning into the classroom..

    Answer: Consistent student motivation, Use rewards to motivate your students.

    Q3. How making use of flashcards helps to increase student engagement?

    Answer: Flashcards are an extraordinarily effective approach for learning new content, especially in knowledge-intensive disciplines like biology, history, medicine, science, and even language jargon.

    Chat on WhatsApp Call Infinity Learn

      Register to Get Free Mock Test and Study Material



      +91

      Verify OTP Code (required)

      I agree to the terms and conditions and privacy policy.