ChemistryTin – Formula, Characteristics, Comparison, Uses, Allotropes and Harmful Effects

Tin – Formula, Characteristics, Comparison, Uses, Allotropes and Harmful Effects

What is Tin? ;

Tin is a chemical element with the symbol Sn and atomic number 50. Tin is a silvery-white, malleable metal with a very low melting point. It is used in many alloys and as a coating for other metals.

Tin is a chemical element with the symbol Sn and atomic number 50. Tin is a silvery-white, malleable metal with a very low melting point. It is used in many alloys and as a coating for other metals. Tin is a post-transition metal in group 14 of the periodic table. It is less reactive than lead and has five stable isotopes. Tin is abundant and relatively inexpensive. It is a poor conductor of electricity but is used in many alloys because of its low melting point.

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    Tin Formula

    The tin formula is Sn. Tin is a chemical element with the symbol Sn and atomic number 50. It is a silvery white, malleable, and ductile metal with a low melting point. Tin is used in many alloys, including bronze, pewter, and solder.

    Characteristics of Tin

    Tin is a soft, malleable, and ductile metal with a silvery-white color. It is a relatively poor conductor of electricity and heat. Tin has a relatively low melting point of 231.9 °C (442.5 °F) and a boiling point of 2,625 °C (4,757 °F). It is resistant to corrosion and is non-toxic.

    Comparison of Tin with Other Group 14th Elements

    The physical and chemical properties of Tin (Sn) are very similar to those of the other Group 14th elements, carbon (C), silicon (Si), and germanium (Ge). Tin has a metallic luster, is a good conductor of electricity, and melts at a relatively low temperature of 232°C. Like carbon, tin can exist in two different allotropic forms: a hard, brittle form called alpha-tin, and a more malleable form called beta-tin. Tin is not as reactive as carbon, silicon, or germanium, and does not form as many compounds. The most important tin compound is tin(II) oxide, which is used to make tin cans and other tin-plated objects.

    Uses of Tin

    Tin is used in a variety of ways, including:

    -In the manufacturing of cans for food and drink
    -In the production of solder
    -As a coating on other metals to prevent corrosion

    Allotropes of Tin

    Tin has four allotropes:

    1) Alpha tin: This is the most common form of tin. It is a silver-white metal that is malleable and ductile.

    2) Beta tin: This is a hard, brittle form of tin that is used to make alloys with other metals.

    3) Gamma tin: This is a very rare form of tin that is a superconductor at low temperatures.

    4) Delta tin: This is a very rare form of tin that is a semiconductor.

    Harmful Effects of Tin

    Tin is a metal that is found in the earth’s crust. It is used to make cans, solder, coins and other objects. Tin has a few harmful effects on the body. Tin can cause lung cancer, skin cancer, and other health problems. It can also cause problems with the reproductive system and the nervous system.

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