PhysicsWhy does the light reflect? What happens if we replace the opaque object with a transparent object?

Why does the light reflect? What happens if we replace the opaque object with a transparent object?


  1. A
    It reflects because the mirror bounced back the reflection.
  2. B
    Because mirror can not absorb the light rays
  3. C
    Because it’s the law of nature
  4. D
    It’s cooler that the heat 

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    Solution:

    Concept: This exercise helps us understand how light moves and is reflected off of a mirror. Objects that are opaque prevent light from passing through them. Light can travel through transparent things, allowing us to see clearly through them. Light can partially flow through translucent things.
    Let's first examine the process of light reflection. Not every sort of light is visible to us. There are several kinds of light. Some of them are visible with our eyes alone. For instance, ultraviolet light is invisible to the human eye. However, the rule of reflection applies to all forms of radiation. The light wave that is coming in is known as the incident wave, and the wave that is being reflected off of the surface is known as the reflected wave. A visible white light source that is incidentally pointed towards the surface of a mirror will reflect that light into space at an angle that is equal to the incident angle.Therefore, for visible light and all other wavelengths of the electromagnetic radiation spectrum, the angle of incidence is the same as the angle of reflection. This idea is frequently referred to as the Law of Reflection. It is significant to notice that because the light is not "bent" or refracted and is being reflected at all wavelengths equally, it is not broken up into its individual hues. Although practically all surfaces will reflect light to some extent, particularly smooth surfaces, like a glass mirror or polished metal, work best for doing so.
    The reflection takes place in the mirror. And this phenomenon is known as the law of reflection. And for that surface bounces the wave away and if we replace the opaque object the surface will absorb  the light.
    Hence, the correct option is 1.
     
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