BiologyProcess of Life in Terms of Plants and Animals

Process of Life in Terms of Plants and Animals

Six Stages of Life Processes in Humans and Plants

There are six stages of life processes in humans and plants: embryonic development, birth, growth and development, reproduction, aging, and death.

Embryonic development is the process of growing from a fertilized egg into a fetus and then a baby. Birth is the process of being born. Growth and development is the process of growing from a baby into an adult. Reproduction is the process of producing offspring. Aging is the process of becoming older. Death is the process of dying.

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    Nutrition in Plant

    Plants are autotrophs, which means they can create their own food from simple inorganic molecules. The process of photosynthesis uses sunlight to convert water and carbon dioxide into glucose and oxygen. Plants store glucose in their cells as starch. They use the glucose to produce energy and to build other molecules needed for growth. Plants also produce a variety of other organic molecules, including proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids.

    Nutrition in Animals

    There are six main nutrients that are essential for animal life: water, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, minerals, and vitamins.

    Water is the most important nutrient for all animals. It is necessary for metabolism, transport of nutrients and waste products, and many other biochemical processes.

    Carbohydrates are the second-most important nutrient for animals. They are the main energy source for most animals and are necessary for the proper function of the nervous and immune systems.

    Lipids are necessary for the growth and development of animals. They are also the main energy source for the brain and play a role in the transport of some nutrients.

    Proteins are necessary for the growth and repair of tissues. They also play a role in the immune system and the transport of nutrients.

    Minerals are necessary for the growth and development of animals. They are also necessary for the proper function of the nervous and immune systems.

    Vitamins are necessary for the growth and development of animals. They are also necessary for the proper function of the nervous and immune systems.

    Nutrition in Humans:

    Humans need certain nutrients to survive. The body can produce some of these nutrients, but others must come from food.

    There are six classes of nutrients: carbohydrates, proteins, lipids (fats and oils), vitamins, minerals, and water.

    Carbohydrates are the body’s main source of energy. They are found in food in the form of sugars, starches, and fiber.

    Proteins are essential for the body to build and repair tissues. They are found in food in the form of amino acids.

    Lipids are necessary for the body to build cell membranes, create hormones, and store energy. They are found in food in the form of fatty acids and cholesterol.

    Vitamins are needed for the body to use carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids. They are found in food in the form of water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins.

    Minerals are needed for the body to build bones, teeth, and muscle, and to regulate metabolism. They are found in food in the form of electrolytes and trace minerals.

    Water is necessary for the body to function. It is found in food and drink in the form of water and moisture.

    Transportation In Plants

    Plants need water and minerals to grow, and they need to get these from the soil. So plants have developed special mechanisms to take up water and minerals from the soil and to transport them to all the different parts of the plant.

    The water and minerals are transported in the plant through a system of tubes called xylem. The xylem is made up of tiny tubes that run throughout the plant. The water and minerals are transported up the xylem tubes by a process called osmosis.

    The osmosis process is driven by the plant’s need for water. The water enters the xylem tubes by osmosis, and then travels up to the leaves. The leaves need the water to carry out the process of photosynthesis, which is how plants produce their food.

    The minerals are also transported up the xylem tubes to the leaves. The minerals are important for the plant’s growth and development.

    Oxygen Transportation in Humans

    The oxygen transportation in humans is done by the red blood cells. The red blood cells contain hemoglobin, which is a protein that binds to oxygen. The hemoglobin binds to the oxygen in the lungs and then transports the oxygen to the other parts of the body.

    Circulatory System

    The circulatory system is a network of blood vessels that carries blood throughout the body. The heart is the central organ of the circulatory system, and it pumps blood through the vessels. The blood carries oxygen and nutrients to the body’s tissues, and it removes waste products.

    Respiration in Plants

    The process of respiration in plants is similar to the process of respiration in animals. The plant takes in oxygen from the air and uses it to break down glucose, releasing carbon dioxide.

    Respiration in Roots

    The main function of root respiration is to provide energy for plant growth. The root system is constantly respiring to provide energy for the uptake of water and minerals from the soil and for the transport of these essential nutrients throughout the plant.

    Transportation Nitrogen in Plants

    Plants need nitrogen to grow and produce flowers and fruit. Nitrogen is found in the air and in the soil. Most plants can get enough nitrogen from the air, but legumes (plants in the pea family) can get nitrogen from the soil by using bacteria that live in their roots.

    Delivery of Water in Flowers

    Water is an essential component of life. All living things need water to survive. Plants get the water they need from the soil. When a plant is given water in the form of a bouquet of flowers, the water travels from the soil up through the plant’s stem and into the flowers.

    Respiratory in Human

    The respiratory system in human beings is responsible for the intake and exchange of gases between the environment and the bloodstream. The system includes the nose, mouth, pharynx, larynx, trachea, bronchi, and lungs. The lungs are the primary organs of the respiratory system, and they are responsible for the exchange of carbon dioxide and oxygen between the blood and the environment.

    Reproduction in Plants

    The process of reproduction in plants is called fertilization. In fertilization, a sperm cell from the male plant combines with an egg cell from the female plant. This combination forms a new plant that is a genetic copy of the original plant.

    Sexual Reproduction in Plants

    Sexual reproduction in plants occurs when the male and female reproductive cells (sperm and egg) unite to form a new organism. Plants reproduce sexually by transferring pollen from the male organ (stamen) to the female organ (pistil). The pollen contains the male genetic material, and the ovule contains the female genetic material. The pollen and ovule unite to form a zygote, which develops into a new plant.

    Reproduction in Human

    Beings

    Reproduction is the process by which new individual organisms are produced from their parents. In humans, reproduction occurs as the result of sexual activity between male and female individuals. During sexual reproduction, the male reproductive cells, or sperm, and the female reproductive cells, or eggs, unite to form a new organism.

    The process of human reproduction is complex and involves a number of different steps. The first step is the production of the male and female sex cells, or gametes. The male sex cells, or sperm, are produced in the testes, while the female sex cells, or eggs, are produced in the ovaries.

    The second step is the transportation of the sex cells to the reproductive organs. The sperm are transported to the penis, where they are deposited inside the female during sexual intercourse. The eggs are transported to the uterus, where they are implanted in the lining of the uterus and develop into a new organism.

    The third step is the development of the new organism. After the egg is implanted in the uterus, it begins to develop into a new organism. The development of the new organism is a complex process that involves the interaction of the egg and the sperm with other cells and tissues in the uterus. The new organism continues to grow and develop until it is ready to be born.

    The fourth step is the birth of the new organism. The birth of a new human being is a process that involves the separation of the new

    The Process of Fertilisation and Further Development

    Fertilisation

    In order for fertilisation to occur, the sperm must first be deposited in the woman’s reproductive tract. This can be accomplished by sexual intercourse, but can also occur through assisted reproductive technologies such as in vitro fertilisation.

    Once the sperm is in the woman’s reproductive tract, it begins to swim towards the egg. The egg is released from the ovary and begins to move down the fallopian tube. The sperm also begins to move towards the egg.

    The sperm and the egg eventually meet in the middle of the fallopian tube. The sperm then attaches to the egg and the two cells merge to form a single cell. This is the beginning of a new human life.

    The fertilised egg then begins to move down the fallopian tube towards the uterus. The cells within the egg begin to divide and the embryo begins to form.

    The embryo will continue to grow and develop until it is ready to be born. Approximately nine months after fertilisation, the baby will be born.

    Excretion

    Urine

    Feces

    sweat

    saliva

    What substances are eliminated by the kidneys?

    Water, electrolytes, urea, and creatinine.

    Excretion in Plant Life

    Plants excrete waste products in several ways. One way is through their roots in the form of excess water, dissolved minerals, and organic molecules. This process is called rhizodeposition. Another way plants excrete waste is through their leaves in the form of water vapor and other gases. This process is called transpiration.

    Excretion in Human Beings

    Urine

    The vast majority of the water that is ingested is excreted in urine. Urine is a solution of water, salts, and organic molecules that is produced by the kidneys. The kidneys extract the water and solutes from the blood and secrete them into the urinary bladder. When the bladder is full, the individual expels the urine through the urethra.

    Sweat

    Water is also lost through sweat. Sweat is produced by the sweat glands and it consists of water, salts, and organic molecules. Sweat evaporates and the individual loses water through it.

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